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Shelley Ettinger's Vera's WillI at the Denver Library; : Review of Vera's Will in the Fall 2015 issue of Lilith; Miriam Frank gives a Rave Review in Work History News Vol. 33 No. 2!; Lambda Literary Review ; New Pages Review ;Interview with Shelley 6-4-15; Start with a Story Blog;  Blog post by Carol Rosenfeld; NYU Stories profile of Shelley Ettinger ; Library Journal calls Shelley Ettinger's Vera's Will "powerful, superbly written" and "a breathtaking achievement"!!!; Beth Barrett calls Vera's Will an "instant classic." ; good review at http://www.workers.org/articles/2015/03/19/veras-will-shows-a-better-lifes-in-birth/ .

 

 

2-15-15 reading and celebration: Shelley Ettinger, Shelley and Meredith Sue Willis; the book; MSW and Carole Rosenthal

 

Jane Lazarre has a new article online at TomDispatch about being the mother of black sons.

Latest book by Hamilton Stone writer Meredith Sue Willis: Meli's Way from Montemayor Press .
Praise for Reamy Jansen's Available Light: "This is a soft spoken heartfelt book--one to be read slowly, akin to short sips from a glass of fine wine."     — Robert Milo-Baldwin, Bloomsbury Review of Books
More books by Reamy Jansen: Two Ways of Not Hearing and My Drive, A Natural History are both at Finishing Line Press in Georgetown, KY. Two Ways of Not Hearing covers issues of mortality and constancy and the threats of getting older. My Drive is a series of linked prose poems about commuting to work and going solo to the unknown
A selection from Carole Rosenthal's memoir The Woods (1953) has been published in a March 2014 anthology Not Somewhere Else but Here, from Sundress Publications.
Hamilton Stone's newest provisional member is Shelley Ettinger. Her upcoming novel is Vera's Will, which ranges the twentieth century from the Kishinev pogrom to American homophobia in the nineteen-twenties-- to the struggle for GLBT rights in the nineteen-seventies! See Shelley's blog.
A new selection from Carole Rosenthal's novel-in-progress and an interview at Works in Progress.
Edith Konecky's Fiction and the Facts of Life is now available as an ebook: For the Kindle edition, click here; for all other formats, click here.
Hamilton Stone Review #30 Winter-Spring 2014  has lots of great reading: Poetry by Gale Acuff, Kevin Carey, Michelle Disler, Doug Draime, Susan J. Erickson, Kate Falvey, William Ford, Benjamin Goluboff, Howie Good, Hannah Greenberg, Michael Hettich, Charlene Langfur, Catherine Morocco, Keith Moul, Frederick Pollack, Mary Ann Rockwell, Gerard Sarnat, and David Trame; Fiction by Ellen Alexander Conley, Arturo Desimone, Priscilla Jolly, Edith Konecky, and Jane Stark; and Nonfiction by Gretchen Clark, Chelsey Clammer, Bruce Colbert, Catherine Mauk, and Jay Hansford C. Vest.
January 15, 2014: Trina Carter in FOREWORD REVIEWS says of Miguel Ortiz's new Hamilton Stone novel Parental Sins,"Drawing on folkloric traditions, Miguel Antonio Ortiz explores themes of sin and salvation, guilt and atonement, betrayal and forgiveness....By turns philosophical and metaphorical, he manages to poke fun at 'the viability of sin' while considering what it means to have inherited from our original parents 'the guilt that requires having to expiate timeand again the crime of having eaten the apple.'"
Hamilton Stone author Meredith Sue Willis has a new e-book-only out from Foreverland Press, Love Palace.
Excellent review of Lynda Schor's Sexual Harassment Rules from The Brooklyn Rail.
Hamilton Stone author Meredith Sue Willis has a new story in the Winter 2014 issue of Persimmon Tree. It's an updated version of "Little Red Riding Hood" called "Feral Grandmothers: Little Red's"
Hamilton Stone Editions poet, James Cervantes read from his new book, From Mr. Bondo's Unshared Life Tuesday, December 10, 2013, 7:00 PM at Changing Hands Bookstorein Tempe, Arizona.
Hamilton Stone author and editorial board member Lynda Schor has a new book from Spuyten Duyvil Press :Sexual Harrassment Rules.
There was an interview with Leora Skolkin-Smith in Lilith magazine about about the re-release of her novel "Hystera" (winner of the Global -Ebooks Award and the USA Book Award in Fiction).
Harriet Rzetelny's short story "Tag Line" will be published soon in Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine.
On September 9, 2013 there was a program on radio station WBAI that included novelist Leora Skolkin speaking about the re-release of her novel "Hystera" (winner of the Global -Ebooks Award and the USA Book Award in Fiction).
Hamilton Stone author Leora Skolkin-Smith's novel HYSTERA was recently re-released The StoryPlant, run by  Lou Aronica, former VP of Ballantine/Bantam Books and Former Senior Publisher at Avon. This is in conjunction with The Trident Media Group and Robert Gottlieb.  HYSTERA is the winner of two awards, the Global -Ebooks Award and the USA Book Award in Fiction
Hamilton Stone author Halvard Johnson's book of poems Remains to Be Seen  has been published by Spuyten Duyvil Press.
Hamilton Stone Editions author Leora Skolkin-Smith's essay on Clarice Lispector, "Words Are Living Tissue," published at the Quarterly Review is being taught at Bard College for a course called: "The Antiheroine: Writing the Female Rebel." Lispector was a feminist of the 1960's and 70's who has been been virtually erased by our current literary scene.
  and
Now in all e-book formats: Available Light by Reamy Jansen and  Dwight's House and Other Stories by Meredith Sue Willis
Hamilton Stone Review # 28 is now available:  Fiction by Steven Schrader and Jay Baruch, nonfiction by E.J. Myers, poetry by Judith Skillman-- and many, many more!
There was a wine and cheese party launching Homeward Bound by Howard Waskow with Bell Chevigny, Jan Clausen, Arthur Waskow, Dan Waskow, Phyllis Berman and Barbara Kane on Wednesday, November 14, 2012, at 7 p.m. at Book Culture between Broadway and Amsterdam in New York City. In Homeward Bound, Howard weaves together three strands of experience with family issues, a trained literary critic's grasp of how great literature illuminates family life, and insights from thirty years of work as a psychotherapist into joys, disasters, and moments of deep healing in widely varied families. Howard was already gravely ill when he learned that Hamilton Stone Publishers had accepted Homeward Bound. He asked his brother Arthur to shepherd the book to publication. This event was a celebration of Howard's writing, the lifework it represents, and its public availability, thanks to his brother's dedication.
Halvard Johnson reports the death of Hamilton Stone Review poet Sybil Kollar. See poems at Hamilton Stone Review # 5 .
Hamilton Stone author wins Global E-book award! Congratulations, Leora Skolkin-Smith!
Eva Kollisch's book mentioned in The Forward

Hamilton Stone Author Leora Skolki-Smith was interviewed about her work  from the perspective of being an "Israeli-American" writer. She says this is a label she doesn't use, "but it was interesting to look at things from that place inside." The interview is available online in a piece about the new International Journal Jewishnet, published by Nora Gold: http://www.algemeiner.com/2012/09/19/jewish-fiction-finds-a-new-home-on-the-internet/ Jewish Fiction Finds a New Home on the Internet

 

 

 

"The poems [James Cervantes' Sleepwalker's Songs] never fail to enthrall or intrigue. There are moments when the poems fold back in on themselves & after reading one need re-visit the poem with an other or newer perception or perspective. And sometimes the poems refuse closure at all, opening out onto greater vantage points or unexpected vistas than one might normally expect to encounter in the usual lyric—a hallmark of his remarkable poetry.... I suspect that Cervantes’ audience is not nearly as wide as it should be. I most highly recommend this astonishing collection as I believe you’ll find poetry here unlike most of what you might be used to reading."

                                                              --   Jim Heavily in Hinchas de Poesia . (Click to read whole review)

 

 

Hamilton Stone author Leora Skolkin-Smith is Finalist for Three Major E-Books Awards for her novel HYSTERA. The 2012 International Book Award, the National Indie Excellence Award; and the upcoming Global E-Books Award, 2012, which will be announced on August 18, 2012, in Santa Barbara, CA. Ms. Skolkin-Smith has said about these recent accolades, "I think the awards attest to the fact that the publishing landscape is changing radically through the growing acceptance of e-books as well as a new approach to marketing titles of literary merit that don't meet commercial standards and don't fall into "brand-name" status with traditional publishers and reviewers. There seems to be a critical mass of independent writers who have distanced themselves from the mainstream. "

Her novel with Hamilton Stone, THE FRAGILE MISTRESS, is currently in pre-production as a film with Triboro Pictures directed by Michael Gunther.

Jane Lazarre's interview is featured on the Jewish Librarians' Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/jewishlibraries (Scroll to July 16, 2012)
An excerpt from Hamilton Stone Editions novel The Fragile Mistress by Leora Skolkin-Smith will appear in  an anthology called The Long and Winding Road, Stories from Writers about the 1960's from Dzanc Books.
Excellent interview of Hamilton Stone poet James Cervantes at Giant Step!
Two Ways of Not Hearing by Hamilton Stone Author Reamy Jansen is coming in the fall from Finishing Line Press! (pre-order forthcoming titles in Bookstore). "Secrets we've never heard before," says Dan Masterson, and Kevin Prufer calls it a "terrific collection...intriguing, deeply intelligent.
A collection of short stories by Hamilton Stone Review contributor Katherine Holmes (Issue #8), Curiosity Killed the Sphinx and Other Stories, is the winner of the Prize Americana from Hollywood Books International, Fiction Imprint of Press Americana ISBN. The book (978-0982955833) is published in paperback and available at Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble, and in distribution from Ingram. It will also be available as an ebook and Kindle edition later in the summer of 2012.
Hamilton Stone Author Eva Kollisch  to receive the Theodor Kramer Prize in May 2012 in Austria. This prize is given by the Vienna in Austria to a writer whose work has literary merit and engages with issues of "exile, emigration, and resistance." Eva's books books have been translated and published in Austria. Congratultions to Eva!    Last year's winner was Ruth Klueger .
 
Review of Meredith Sue Willis's Re-Visions  at Books by Women

A story by Carole Rosenthal in the latest issue of Sol Literary Magazine
Harriet Rzetelny Spoke at the Provincetown Library March 22, 2012  Hamilton Stone Author Harriet Rzetelny of Dennis, MA, author of the novel Graveyard Blues, discussed her beautifully written work at the Provincetown Library, Provincetown, MA, on Thursday, March 22, 2012. The novel reveals both the extraordinary in ordinary lives and the ordinary and familiar in the lives of people who are marginalized.
The Fragile Mistress by Leora Skolkin-Smith selected by Princeton University as part of a large event featuring women writers and artists who write about the Middle East (including Israel), called the "Fertile Crescent." Leora will be giving a talk, reading and signing books there in October.
New Pages says Miguel Ortiz's Cisco Kid in the Bronx "may remind the reader of the classic collection Drown by Junot Diaz"!
Interview of Jane Lazarre about INHERITANCE online at the Lilith blog. The inteview is by YonaMcDonough, fiction editor at Lilith Magazine.
Reader Views says of Edith Konecky's Fiction and the Facts of Life, "A quirky end ... captures its overall theme very nicely," and the Midwest Book Review calls it  "timeless."
The Midwest Book Review calls Miguel Ortiz's The Cisco Kid in the Bronx "an insightful delve into growing up in Puerto Rico...highly recommended."
Jane Lazarre interview at The Chronicle: Rejoining the Parts: A Conversation with Jane Lazarre About Race, Fiction, American History and Her New Novel, Inheritance
Two Ways of Not Hearing by Hamilton Stone Author Reamy Jansen is coming out in fall 2012 from Finishing Line Press! (pre-order forthcoming titles in Bookstore). "Secrets we've never heard before," says Dan Masterson, and Kevin Prufer calls it a "terrific collection...intriguing, deeply intelligent.
A collection of short stories by Hamilton Stone Review contributor Katherine Holmes (Issue #8), Curiosity Killed the Sphinx and Other Stories, is the winner of the Prize Americana from Hollywood Books International, Fiction Imprint of Press Americana ISBN. The book (978-0982955833) is published in paperback and available at Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble, and in distribution from Ingram. It will also be available as an ebook and Kindle edition later in the summer of 2012.
Hammilton Stone Author Leora Skolkin-Smith attended a luncheon where she met First Lady Michelle Obama-- and gave her a copy of her Hamilton Stone Editions novel The Fragile Mistress!
 
E-book is Love and Money by Edith Konecky-- now available for the Kindle and all formats
Coming soon: New Poems by James Cervantes
A story by Carole Rosenthal in the latest issue of Sol Literary Magazine
 
Harriet Rzetelny Spoke at the Provincetown Library March 22
Hamilton Stone Author Harriet Rzetelny of Dennis, MA, author of the novel Graveyard Blues, discussed her beautifully written work at the Provincetown Library, Provincetown, MA, on Thursday, March 22, 2012. The novel reveals both the extraordinary in ordinary lives and the ordinary and familiar in the lives of people who are marginalized.
The Fragile Mistress by Leora Skolkin-Smith selected by Princeton University as part of a large event featuring women writers and artists who write about the Middle East (including Israel), called the "Fertile Crescent." Leora will be giving a talk, reading and signing books there in October.
New Pages says Miguel Ortiz's Cisco Kid in the Bronx "may remind the reader of the classic collection Drown by Junot Diaz"!
Interview of Jane Lazarre about INHERITANCE online at the Lilith blog. The inteview is by YonaMcDonough, fiction editor at Lilith Magazine.
Reader Views says of Edith Konecky's Fiction and the Facts of Life, "A quirky end ... captures its overall theme very nicely," and the Midwest Book Review calls it  "timeless."
The Midwest Book Review calls Miguel Ortiz's The Cisco Kid in the Bronx "an insightful delve into growing up in Puerto Rico...highly recommended."
Jane Lazarre interview at The Chronicle: Rejoining the Parts: A Conversation with Jane Lazarre About Race, Fiction, American History and Her New Novel, Inheritance

Hamilton Stone Author Eva Kollisch will Receive the Theodor Kramer Prize in May 2012 in Austria. This prize is given by the Vienna in Austria to a writer whose work has literary merit and engages with issues of "exile, emigration, and resistance." Eva's books books have been translated and published in Austria. Congratultions to Eva!    Last year's winner was Ruth Klueger .
Bucknell Magazine called Meredith Sue Willis's Re-Visions "highly original," and Mid West Book Review in the November 2011 issue said it is "an ideal addition to any general community library collection."

Leora Skolkin-Smith has a new story online.
Reamy Jansen's chapbook, "Two Ways of Not Hearing," was one of the ten finalists selected by Finishing Line Press.
New Review of Nathan Leslie's Night Sweat at Chamber Four: "There’s pure satisfaction to be derived from reading Nathan Leslie’s poems, in their sense of immediacy, and that’s what poetry is all about, finally, isn’t it?  There may be wisdom here, too."
There is a new interview of Jane Lazarre about INHERITANCE online at the Lilith Blog. The inteview is by Yona McDonough, fiction editor at Lilith Magazine.
Leslie Granier in Reader Views says of Fiction and the Facts of Life, "A quirky end ... captures its overall theme very nicely."
Of Edith Konecky's new novel Fiction and the Facts of Life, the Midwest Book Review says, "Fiction and the Facts of Life is filled with plenty of sensible wisdom which remains timeless and can be understood for any generation."
The Midwest Book Review calls Miguel Ortiz's The Cisco Kid in the Bronx "an insightful delve into growing up in Puerto Rico...highly recommended."
Jane Lazarre interview at The Chronicle: Rejoining the Parts: A Conversation with Jane Lazarre About Race, Fiction, American History and Her New Novel, Inheritance
Hamilton Stone Author Eva Kollisch will Receive the Theodor Kramer Prize in May 2012 in Austria. This prize is given by the Vienna in Austria to a writer whose work has literary merit and engages with issues of "exile, emigration, and resistance." Eva's books books have been translated and published in Austria. Congratultions to Eva!    Last year's winner was Ruth Klueger .
Bucknell Magazine called Meredith Sue Willis's Re-Visions "highly original."
Leora Skolkin-Smith has a new story online.
Meredith Sue Willis's Re-visions was called "an ideal addition to any general community library collection" by the Mid West Book Review in the November 2011 issue.
Reamy Jansen's chapbook, "Two Ways of Not Hearing," was one of the ten finalists selected by Finishing Line Press.
New Review of Nathan Leslie's Night Sweat at Chamber Four:
"There’s pure satisfaction to be derived from reading Nathan Leslie’s poems, in their sense of immediacy, and that’s what poetry is all about, finally, isn’t it?  There may be wisdom here, too."
Article about Reamy Jansen and Available Light -- See all reviews
Read a sample from Leora Skolkin-Smith's novel The Fragile Mistress in Guernica Magazine
Five Star Review of Harriet Rzetelny's Graveyard Blues!
The Spring 2011 issue of Scene: For Friends and Alumni of Rockland Community College has an article about a memoir writing group led by Hamilton Stone author (and HSR nonfiction Editor) Reamy Jansen, Professor of English.
Essay by Leora Skolkin-Smith on Grace Paley
June 5, 2011 at 3:00 PM: Harriet Rzetelny Sang and Read from Graveyard Blues
at the Jacob Sears Memorial Library, East Dennis, MA
The Friends of the Library of Highland Falls, New York, gave Reamy Jansen "The Written Word Award" that "recognizes the "exceptional talent and achievement of an author residing in our community in 2011." The New York State Legislature also voted an appreciation of Reamy and his work! Congratulations, Reamy!
Hard Copy magazine Slab has short stories by Hamilton Stone authors Nathan Leslie and Meredith Sue Willis
E-Book publications!
Leora Skolkin-Smith and her books
Review of Jane Lazarre's Some Place Quite Unknown at Gently Read Literature
American Book Review Praises Reamy Jansen's Available Light! "With the skill of a master craftsman, the self-admitted 'sentimental hoarder' gathers together the bits and pieces, material and memory, not yet lost to him and builds a cabinet he might pass on to his sons when they're curious about family origins, failed obligations, specific wounds, the possibilities and limitations of forgiveness, abut the ways in which a father remains a son for life, and the unresolved impetus behind his writing about it."
                           -- Steve Davenport, American Book Review, January/February 2011, Volume 32, Number 2 
 

 

Hamilton Stone Writers Read at
Teachers & Writers Collaborative 3-14-11:


Top Row: left photo: Eva Kollisch, Naomi Replansky, Edith Konecky, Carole Rosenthal, Meredith Sue WIllis;
Middle photo top row: Carole Rosenthal introduced; RIght photo : Edith reads;
Second row: Left photo-- Clapping for Edith; Right photo-- Laughing Audience.
Other Hamilton Stone Editions attendees included Reamy Jansen.

 

Of Reamy Jansen's Available Light:Recollections and Reflections of a Son, T. Michael Savage says in the Spring 2011 issue of St. Lawrence University Magazine, "This slim volume of only 91 pages is haunting and engaging. Although quite personal, it explores family relationships and congenital health issues in a way that most people...can identify with.
Another Hamilton Stone Editions Books is now available in e-book formats: Meredith Sue Willis's Higher Ground,first book of the Blair Ellen Morgan trilogy.
Reamy Jansen has a guest blog post at the NBCCR on The New York Times Book Review's "Why Criticism Matters."
Holly Iglesias, whose poems “Kindling, " "Boom,""Middle of Nowhere” and "Wear and Tear" appear in Hamilton Stone Review Issue # 13, has just published a second collection of poetry, Angles of Approach, (White Pine Press, 2010) that includes those poems.
Leora Skolkin-Smith is going to appear with her Hamilton Stone Editions book The Fragile Mistress at the Virginia Book Festival in March, 2011! Learn more here !
See video clips of Harriet Rzetelny on "Books and the World" cable show discussing the source of the title of Graveyard Blues. For more of the interview, click here.Did you know that Hamilton Stone author Lynda Schor is also a visual artist? See some of her latest work here.
Of Halvard Johnson's Organ Harvest with Entrance of Clones, the American Book Review says "...Halvard Johnson epitomizes today's underground poet." See all reviews.
Leora Skolkin-Smith gave a talk at The University of Rochester on THE FRAGILE MISTRESS at the Israel Culture Center  on November 9, 2010.
A new interview of Reamy Jansen appeared in the Times Herald-Record on October 31, 2010.
There's an article about Reamy Jansen and his book Available Light in the July 30, 2010 issue of News of the Highlands from Highland Falls, New York.


Hamilton Stone Editions and the Hamilton Stone Review are named on Dzanc Books' Best of the Web list!

A sample of Leora Skolkin-Smith's novelThe Fragile Mistress ha been published in in Guernica Magazine .

Triboro Pictures' movie of Leora Skolkin-Smith's novel The Fragile Mistress starts filming in September in Jerusalem, Jordan and New York!! Order the book!

 

Mid West Book Reviews called Harriet Rzetelny's Graveyard Blues " A fascinating and intriguing mystery not to be missed."
The review says, Graveyard Blues  "is the story of Molly Lewin as she confronts the crushing environment around her. A homecare worker, she faces a client's murder, and the pending eviction of everyone at a low rent complex as big business wants to take over their land. Crushed between family issues, the murder, and the loss of home for people with few other options,Graveyard Blues is a fascinating and intriguing mystery not to be missed.
                                --  Midwest Book Reviews, July 2010 (5 star review)
[For more reviews of Graveyard Blues, click here.]
 
Hamilton Stone Author Eva Kollisch's book The Ground Under My Feet has just come out in a German edition from Austrian publisher Czernin Verlag. The German title is "Der Boden Unter Meinen Fuessen." Eva will be doing a tour at the end of May, 2010 with readings in three \ cities: Vienna, her hometown Baden; and one in Linz.
 
There's a terrific interview with Hamilton Stone author Jane Lazarre about her writing; about her father, a Communist and member of the Abraham Lincoln brigade; about memoir and fiction; and about her African-American family.
 
Hamilton Stone author Carole Rosenthal has a new short short in the Citron Review.
Hamilton Stone author Meredith Sue Willis has an article in the April issue The Writer magazine on "Film Techniques for Fiction Writers."
Hamilton Stone author Lynda Schor's new book Seduction from Spuyten Duyvil Press is now available.
Hamilton Stone author Halvard Johnson has a new new poetry collection THE PERFECTION OF MOZART’S THIRD EYE AND OTHER SONNETS available in an online edition at http://www.scribd.com/people/documents/14481250-chalk-editions .
Check here  for information about submissions to The Hamilton Stone Review.
Responses to Some Place Quite Unknown -- An interview with Jane Lazarre at Lilith Magazine online -- Jane Lazarre's website

Reviews and responses for Eva Kollisch's memoir -- Eva Kollisch's  website

More information about Rebecca Kavaler: See our Our Authors or the article here. Sample poem
Back issues of the Hamilton Stone Review
Hamilton Stone Review All-West Virginia Issue
Review of Rochelle Ratner's Ben Casey Days  (poems from Marsh Hawk Press)
Bloomsbury Review calls Halvard Johnson's new book
"
thrillingly of the present" and "dazzling!
Latest Issue of Hamilton Stone Review:
Hamilton Stone Review # 18
Latest Hamilton Stone ExtraVolume 2 Number 1
Poems by Rebecca Kavaler
Fall 2008 American Book Review Line on Line Review of Halvard Johnson's
Organ Harvest With Entrance of Clones
Bloomsbury Review calls Halvard Johnson's new book " thrillingly of the present" and "dazzling!
Halvard Johnson's Organ Harvest with Entrance of Clones. Read reviews here!
Latest Issue The Hamilton Stone Review
The Hamilton Stone Extra-- work by Hamilton Stone authors
Hamilton Stone at the AWP Austin 2006 and in New York in 2008.
Review of Rochelle Ratner's Ben Casey Days  (poems from Marsh Hawk Press)
Halvard Johnson's Guide to the Tokyo Subway won a Poetic Diversity Award.
Sally Van Doren, whose poetry appears in the Hamilton Stone Review #11 has won the WALT WHITMAN AWARD.
Hamilton Stone Review poet Mary Rising Higgins died August 26, 2007. Her recent books included: Cliff Tides (Singing Horse Press, 2005), Locus Tides (Potes & Poets Press, 2003), O'Clock (Potes & Poets Press, 2000), Red Table(s (La Alameda Press, 1999).  For some of her poems, see HSR Issues  3, 8 , and 11.

More Obituaries:

 

 

In Memoriam:
Rebecca Kavaler
1920 - 2008

 

 

 

 

 


Rebecca Kavaler's home page


Her work in the Hamilton Stone Review :
Prose
Hamilton Stone Review issue no. 4, fall 2004

Poetry

Hamilton Stone Review issue no. 2, spring 2004

  Hamilton Stone Review issue no. 14, winter 2008

In Memoriam:
Rochelle Ratner
1948 - 2008

 

 

 

 

 

Her Home Page
Visual Work


Her work in the Hamiton Stone Review:
Prose
From her new novel
Poetry
Hamilton Stone Review issue no. 2, spring 2004
Hamilton Stone Review issue no. 5, winter 2005
Hamilton Stone Review issue no. 12, summer 2007
In the Salt River Review

 

 

The Hamilton Stone Extra: Volume 2 Number 1

More Hamilton Stone Extras:
Volume I Number 1  --Edith Konecky Issue
Volume I Number 2  -- Halvard Johnson
Volume I Number 3  -- Carole Rosenthal
Volume I Number 4  -- Meredith Sue Willis
Volume 2 Number 1  -- Rebecca Kavaler
(In order to read these, you'll need Adobe Acrobat Reader, which can be downloaded free  here.)

 

 

 

 

Praise for Night Sweat by Nathan Leslie

Eric Weinstein says in his review in Prick of the Spindle , "Night Sweat is essentially about the encroachment of the dream world on daily life, the endless (re)visitation of one’s past via the vehicle of dream, and the blurring of one’s real and imagined selves. The last few lines of  'In the Rumpus Room'  beautifully sum up the simultaneously nightmarish and nostalgic qualities in these opposing worlds: 'Promise me the forceps aren’t rusty, / that you can pinch me at arm’s length. / Pinch me awake when the clouds cover the sun.'”

 

The Comstock Review says: "Nathan Leslie has turned his strong writing efforts from short stories and other fiction to poetry to produce the unique Night Sweat (Hamilton Stone Editions, 2009), poems of dream and nightmare, vividly described and well-imaged. The poet takes us through a cast of children, memories of experiences at different childhood ages, experiences culled from sights & sites, birds, and art works, seen through a prism of night's distortions, sometimes better than reality, other times not so. The same blurred vision edges the poems of the day as well, and creates a unified vision for this poet's first strong collection of verse.

 

The Midwest Book Review says: " Established fiction author Nathan Leslie comes to readers with his first foray into verse, Night Sweat. A story teller by nature, it rings true through his verse giving readers a glimpse into the common aspects of life that readers so often experience. Night Sweat is an expertly crafted book of work, a fine addition to any collection. "The Portrait": The stain of light from/the thick, entrenched hole/reveals a woman in a sable,/pearls and earrings to her neck,/hair black as her husband/standing stiff next to her.//Their picture is aslant,/strung up on thick thread,/yet the tattered bristles at the/window deny them the moment,/curling the shopworn into redundancy."

 

 

Responses to Jane Lazarre's Some Place Quite Unknown

Some Place Quite Unknown is as intimate and urgent as a poem. Lazarre’s enraptured and lyrical prose probes, with rigor and dazzling artistry, the deepest places of a woman’s heart. A powerful and original work .                                  –-Jaime Manrique, author of Our Lives Are the Rivers, Twilight at the Equator, and other works.
Jane Lazarre’s Some Place Quite Unknown is a beautiful, original novel. I finished it with sadness at having to leave its richly detailed world --- the reverberating psychological repercussions of a woman’s early loss of her mother, the best scenes of psychoanalytic sessions in current literature, exquisitely rendered scenes of nature. Lazarre’s intricate interweaving of ideas and storytelling is akin to reading The Golden Notebook or Simone deBeauvvoir’s The Mandarins for the first time. A contemporary classic
                           –- Marnie Mueller, author of Green Fires, The Climate of the Country, My Mother’s Island
I feel honored as a reader to be ushered into this space where the walls of the psyche become permeable and time boundaries collapse; where cherished differences between “down there” and “up here” stop making sense. This reality of psychic life holds true for us all – and shows that truths are multiple, ever-shifting, resident in the body, not just in words.
           –-Jan Clausen, author of Apples and Oranges, If You Like Difficulty, and other works of poetry and fiction.
I read Some Place Quite Unknown in gulps of deep absorption. It is a beautiful fearless book of unblinking concentration and unfathomable depth – an immense accomplishment.
                           –-Carol Ascher, author of Afterimages, A Family Memoir, The Flood, and other works.

For information at Persimmon Tree, click here.

For more information, click here

 

 

 

 

 

 

News and Reviews for Eva Kollisch's The Ground Under My Feet!

 

Hamilton Stone Author Eva Kollisch's book The Ground Under My Feet has just come out in a German edition from Austrian publisher Czernin Verlag. The German title is "Der Boden Unter Meinen Fuessen." Eva will be doing a tour at the end of May, 2010 with readings in three \ cities: Vienna, her hometown Baden; and one in Linz.
The Ground Under My Feet has been translated into German, and an Austrian publisher, Czernin Verlag, is bringing it out in Spring 2010. Eva appeared at a Symposium in Vienna on the subject of Memory and Exile. The other participating writers came from various backgrounds of persecution, resistance, uprooting, and exile.  The symposium was organized by the Theodor Kramer Gesellschaft and will take place in Vienna from September 24 - 27, 2009. On Sept. 29th, Eva read in Vienna her story "Father" (Vater), followed by an interview.

 

 

Midwest Book Review says the book is "heartwarming and inspiring" and "highly recommended."
Kinderlink says "The general themes may be familiar, but each particular story shows us a different facet of our common experience."
In GERMAN LIFE Don Heinrich Tolzman calls it "gripping as well as fascinating."

 

Eva Kollisch reading from
The Ground Under My Feet at Teachers & Writers
to a standing room only crowd

 

 

Reviews of Organ Harvest with Entrance of Clones

 
By Remy Jansen

I begin with Halvard Johnson's Organ Harvest with Entrance of Clones (Hamilton Stone Editions) because there is no other American poet who writes so thrillingly of the present and with such imagination and craft. This volume, his 13th, is a metrical vortex, dazzling in its constructions.

                                                     in  The Bloomsbury Review, November/December 2007, p. 30.

 

By Jorn Ake

Halvard Johnson's book Organ Harvest with Entrance of Clones represents the work of a quiet pluralist who is by equal measure amazed by the world and dismayed & angered by those who would control it. The poems here range from abstract musings (or amusements) on relationships to ironic assaults on the hypocrisies that run through the current political landscape. Throughout, Johnson uses the fungibility of language to say at least two things at every opportunity, one of them literal and the other ironic or whimsical. There is an aspect of jesterism or merry prankster in each poem, though at the center of the book is an optimism that our "better natures" still reside in us somewhere and that eventually, perhaps through the application of poetry and intelligence, they will rise to the surface, if only just in time. A solid book recommended.

 


By Judith Jenya 

To read Organ Harvest with Entrance of Clones, the 13th book of poetry by San Miguel poet Halvard Johnson, is to have the experience of arriving at thought and words through feelings and images at once bizarre and astute. The title poem probes our contemporary life and mortality in idiosyncratic and elegant language. Johnson’s poems are  highly crafted, obscure, political, and serious, with irony and humor that let the clarity and insights in the poems take the reader to unexpected places. His dour Swedish roots commingle with a somewhat riotous, rather surrealistic take on life, people and contemporary events in this very intelligent and original look at the human condition today. 

Johnson  grew up in the Hudson Valley and NYC and has gathered his images, thoughts and experiences in world travel and while living and teaching in Europe, Asia, and the US. He has received grants from  the National Endowment for the Arts, the Maryland State Arts Council and Baltimore City Arts. He is the poetry editor of the online literary review Hamilton Stone Review and has written for numerous national journals and magazines. He has collaborated with James Cervantes, another San Miguel poet, on a collection of poems written online over a period of several weeks a few years ago. He is collaborating with his wife, prize-winning writer and visual artist, Lynda Schor on a new work of fiction. 

Many of Johnson’s poetry collections are available online. His first four collections can be found at http://capa.conncoll.edu/. An online press called Vida Loca Books (founded by Johnson and Schor) has issued his 14th collection, called Tango Bouquet. To receive a copy via email, send a request message (with Tango Bouquet) in your subject line to him at halvard@earthlink.net.   Pre-publication copies of Organ Harvest with Entrance of Clones are currently available at La Tienda in the Biblioteca Pública, Insurgentes 25 and Café Etc., Reloj 37. 

Johnson, while he thinks it is best to read poetry in solitude, in the dark and still of night, has given public readings of his poetry in San Miguel and threatens to do so again.

                              in the Atención of San Miguel de Allende, Gto., Mexico

 

By Douglas Barbour
I received Halvard Johnson's Organ Harvest with Entrance of Clones yesterday, & a bright bitter sardonic tonic it is.  Many sonnets appear here, but there are also longer poems, poetic sequences, in various forms. Many harvest various texts, dialects & discourses, all to undermine expectations. Sharply etched, & often beautifully illustrating the vagaries of the 'I', these poems exemplify a USAmerican surreality crashing into the politics of being here, now. Certainly a book worth tracking down...."

                                                      Douglas Barbour, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

 

 

 

 

Guide to the Tokyo Subway wins Poetic Diversity Award North American poet.
Halvard Johnson (born 1936) also writes narratives, which are absurd fragments of chaos rather than elegant aesthetic forms; yet in energetic bursts of wit they exhibit uncanny control.
Guide to the Tokyo Subway begins with the title poem that closes: "I'd always thought/ that if I positioned myself/just so,/as the train pulled/into the station/certain forces would come/into play, changing/my outlook on things/in surprising ways/the train would transport me/to a distant station/with an unfamiliar name/in an unfamiliar script/and I would get off/happy to be alive/not knowing which way to turn."
This mock guide intends to keep us off track, since our narrator's Tokyo cannot be trusted any more than his maps of Egypt and Baltimore or dissertations on placebos and white lies.
Johnson casts these clever shadows to the edge of nonsense where media glibly flash the surreal and enduring concepts get devoured in sound bites.
Toward the end of Johnson's 12th book of poems, we read in "Poem" that "The poem begins with the poem/begins with and continues on to say/and continues on to say ... The middle/of the poem consists entirely of the/middle of the poem consists entirely/of the middle of the poem. The poem/ends with the poem ends with a bang."
While Johnson artfully plays with the shape of narrative, Christensen subtly reaffirms its psychic form. Read them to the end.
          -- Robert Bonazzi in ther San Antonio Express-News (Feb. 11, 2007). See the whole article.

 

 

 

 

 

Temporary Meanings by James Cervantes was listed as a "Pick" for March and April 2006 by Small Press Review.

 

Sally Van Doren, whose poetry appears in the Hamilton Stone Review #11  has won the WALT WHITMAN AWARD, one of the most prestigious book contests in the country. It brings book publication to an American poet who has never before published a book of poetry and distributes the book to members of the Academy. The Whitman Award also carries a $5,000 cash prize and a one-month residency at the Vermont Studio Center. She the Award for her book-length collection of poems Sex at Noon Taxes, which will be published in the spring of 2008 by Louisiana State University Press.

 

Praise for Guide to the Tokyo Subway by Halvard Johnson:
Many poets send me their books, but few I've received are as fine as Halvard Johnson'sGuide to the Tokyo Subway.  I have at least fourteen favorite poems, including "Morning Calm," "Paris in Old Photographs," "La Violencia," "How to Write Your Own Obituary" and "Take Me to the Water."  And for sheer delight, "Thirteen Variations on a Line by Robert Frost." In just about all of the poems there's something fascinating—an image, a tone, a total consciousness (often an achieved calm), an experiment with sound or phrasing.  I found myself re-reading many of the poems, so many are "locked" and provide complete satisfaction. It’s also the wide range of Guide to the Toyko Subway that I greatly admire, the complete interest Halvard Johnson brings to so many things, the expansiveness of these poems even while they're leading us to still moments. I've never seen another poet acknowledge the nuclear power plant, include it in solid lines, and then, in the same poem, move beyond it out to the Zen-like horizon in that unique "bomb and calm" style which is all Johnson's own. -- Dick Allen

 

Praise for Drivers and an Interview with Nathan Leslie at Http://www.ghotimag.com/InterviewLeslie.htm
http://www.ghotimag.com/ReviewLeslie.htm
http://www.percontra.net/dbr.html


Praise for View to the North :

 

"... a woman's life journey from youth to middle age, and her experiences as a wife, mother, and lover. The narrative alternates between moments of "then," times past, and moments of "now," living in the present, and confronting the future. Bisexual themes as well as the universal conflicts and self-reflections of a parent watching her chidlren grow up and grow more distant add a poignantly human tone to this introspective story."

Midwest Book Review

Praise for Dwight's House:

"In Dwight's House and Other Stories, Meredith Sue Willis's eclecticism and layered prose releases us from the moorings of "regional fiction." This is a significant book from an accomplished author much deserving of a wider readership."

Main Street Rag, Volume 9, Number 1, Spring 2005

 

"Willis regards all of her characters with unsentimental compassion. Her fiction leads us by the hand into dark places, and then leaves us on our own to find our way out."

-- Margaret Quamme, American Book Review, March-April 2005 Issue

 

 

Full Reviews on the Catalog page

 

 

 

 

 
The Animal Within
By Rebecca Kavaler (from The Animal Within)

                                                  Homage to Sir Thomas Browne


We, who supposedly contain all Africa and her prodigies,
are revealed for what we are only in the dying
when this flesh, once apostrophized as too too solid,
has proven renderable as any carcass and in the process
manufactured hollows where hillocks of cheeks once smiled,
then weeded out the overgrowth of hair to uncover
a tenderness-evoking curve of skull,
                       a property we had thought
                       only of the newly born.

The mirror reflects no longer a unique face but the template
of the race: uncles, aunts, cousins far removed, some ancestor
who left no trace in family history yet surfaces now like
a species long thought extinct hauled up from the ocean’s depths
and when that dissolves what is left
                       but the animal within
                       which we made so much of.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our Table at the 2008 AWP Conference in New York


Edith Konecky                                              Meredith Sue Willis

 

Rochelle Ratner                                                                                          Edith Konecky

 

 

 

Photos from the AWP in Austin 2006




Photos from top, left to right: Hamilton Stone table, Hal & Lynda; Nathan & Hal; Jim; table; Nathan; Books!

 

 

 

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